Interview with Taylor Rhoads

Interview with Taylor Rhoads

Question 1: How did you come up with the minimalist caption theme on your page?
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Answer 1: “I think as much of my own POV as I can withhold from the viewer leaves the images more widely open for personal interpretation. It creates ambiguity and room for subjective analysis. My goal is to spark imagination and questions by nudging the subconscious with subject matter and a mood or feeling created by light and/or color.”


Question 2: Any reason in choosing the dark and eerie theme for your page, it is quite unique.
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Answer 2: “Living and working in Los Angeles is tense and frenetic. Heading to the outskirts at 3am allows me to find the solitude, desolation and silence that are almost completely nonexistent in this city. I think the images are more so a product of that choice rather than me deciding “I am going to go make photographs that look dark and haunting”. It occurs rather organically by shooting images of residences and closed businesses while ~99% of the city is asleep.”


Question 3: Do you plan on getting a mass following on your page or keep it small and not out there?
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Answer 3: “I find the most joy in getting recognition from those photographers whose work inspires me and those that I respect and admire as fellow creatives. There are so many talented people in our community. For me, it’s really about the quality of the interactions/feedback and building a sense of community through engagement. I find this so much more valuable than a building a staggering number of followers at the top of my Instagram page.”


Question 4: Tips for upcoming photographers in the scene?
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Answer 4:

“Any tips I can give are ones that I have gotten or read in books from photographers far more talented and accomplished than myself. A few that have resonated with me are:


 - Look at a TON of photographs and flood your mind with visuals. Study them, pull tiny details that can help inform your approach, composition, color or lighting. 


 - Learn to be self-critical and learn to edit well. Know when to scrap an image or when to go back and reshoot. Learn to push or hold back with color or exposure to achieve the mood or feeling you want to convey. There is amazing power in subtlety and restraint. 


 - Above all else, work hard and keep shooting. I went through a period of 5-6 years where I put down my cameras, and I wish I hadn’t.” 


Question 5: Do you consider yourself an amateur or reasonably experienced in your hobby?
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Answer 5: “love making photographs and I count myself among the endless masses of talented amateurs chasing a lifelong passion. Who really knows where any of this will lead me tomorrow or ten or twenty years down the road, but I’m enjoying the creative process and the constant growth along the way.”



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