Interview Aude Nasr

Interview Aude Nasr


Question 1: Where are you from? 

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Answer: “I was born in Croydon (UK), and live in Paris. But I'm actually half lebanese-syrian and half-french.”


Question 2: Does location matter in your opinion?

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Answer: “In my opinion, it definitely does - not only in the present, but also as one cloudy recollection. I picture the inside of my brain as some kind of huge, evanescent maze, full of fragmentary reminiscences of places. Wherever your eyes are or were is kind of the beginning of your mental imagery.”


Question 3: Where do you see yourself in the future regarding photograph?

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Answer: “Exploring technique and my own lonely aesthetics is loads of fun, but I hope to be moving on to something more documentary in the future. Take my photography closer to the minorities I belong to, or connect to. Just create fragments and proofs of our existences, somewhere in the middle of it all.”


Question 4: Do you shoot alone or with other photographers?

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Answer: “Oh, I'm a lone wolf. Photography has been a quite space for me these past few months, as opposed to my job as a set designer. Also, I shoot mostly at night, so yeah, I'm more of a loner. Even my portraits are shot in a very intimate, one-to-one atmosphere.”


Question 5: Is storytelling necessary in your opinion?

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Answer: “I strongly believe we're all telling so many stories in everything we do : dressing up, eating, interacting, crafting... Whether it becomes conscious or not when taking pictures is a good question ! Probably depends, though nothing seems very necessary to me as long as you're executing your vision.”


Question 6: How do you feel social media is changing the way we view photography as a whole?

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Answer: “More people have more access to more images, which is great. In return we also tend to be way overstimulated sometimes. To me, photography and images are two different notions, and aren't born of the same process, nor have the same purpose. There's a lot to do with profit, but to be honest I try not to think about it too much.”


Question 7: What is one key takeaway for a photographer that is struggling creatively?

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Answer: “Intuition-following is super important to me. Working in the arts field sometimes pushes you to treat your creativity like a mass-production machine and overthink everything you do. Sometimes, just letting go helps realize that without knowing it, you're already saying something throughout your work - no need for all the mental pressure. Also when I feel like I'm struggling too much with my own thoughts and ideas, I grab a book. Helps you get out of your own brain, create more and more mental images, while look through someone else’s eyes.”


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