Interview with Ali Young

Interview with Ali Young

Question 1: How long have you been taking photography seriously?
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Answer 1. “I've been taking photography more seriously since getting my first couple of film rolls developed. I was amazed with how the pictures turned out, and that sparked my interest even more. I shot more consistently, mostly around the city and nature. Eventually I did a collaborative photo shoot with an aspiring model and artist. Ever since that shoot, I've been shooting more portraits since."


Question 2: What is your take on the PA photography community?
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Answer 2. “I'm not so rooted into the photography community of PA, so I can't speak much about it. However, in my city I feel like we're a humble photography community. I mostly network with fellow photographers and aspiring models/artists on social media (Instagram). There are different kinds of photographers, some focus solely on portraits, others urban city, some dabble in nature photography. So I like to say the styles of our photography community are diverse.”


Question 3: Do you have prints available for purchase?
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Answer 3. “Officially, I don't have print available for purchase. However, I am opening an online print shop for people to order the pictures I make available in the near future, probably sometime in November. I'm always open to do a special print job for anything specific that I posted on my social media.”


Question 4. What is your opinion on the Mamiya?
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Answer 4. “The Mamiya model I have is the 645 1000s. The ergonomics of the body is very similar to that of a 35mm SLR. Very straight forward. I'm still getting used to loading film into it, as it's not exactly the same, but a bit more friendly in my opinion. I recently got a new lens for it, so I'm excited to try it out next time I shoot with it. Overall, I think it's a good camera to buy for someone who wants to either try or get more into shooting 120 (medium format) film.”


Question 5: How long does it take to develop your compositions? 
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Answer 5. “I drop off my film at my local lab. It takes about a day for it to get developed depending on the time I drop it off. Usually no more than 30 min. on average. The longest part is having to scan them at home myself into my laptop. I recently started developing my very own black and white film at my university. The first roll I developed took about 40 min or so because I was basically being taught how to do it.”


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