Interview with Caitlin Fullam

Interview with Caitlin Fullam


Question 1: How did you begin your photo taking journey?

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Answer: I started messing around with disposable cameras first in my late teens/early twenties, then 35mm cameras with expired film. I adored the surprise component of getting my film developed, and the innate soft beauty film creates. Nowadays I mainly use digital but I keep a film camera around for fun, when I think of it.


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Question 2: Where did you grow up?

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Answer: I grew up in small town in northern New Jersey, quite close to New York City. Since then I've lived in many different places. And I'd say I'm still growing up. Not that I'm especially childlike, but that my surroundings and experiences continue to shape me greatly.


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Question 3: What camera do you use? Do you think gear matters?

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Answer: I Don't think gear matters much if your aim is to express yourself and create art. That said, I remember hearing when I was first starting out that you shouldn't upgrade your gear until you've reached the limits of your current set up. I didn't really understand what that meant at the time, but now I do and I completely agree. When I feel it's time to upgrade, I buy second-hand through Craigslist.  I currently use a Canon 6D with a Canon 24-70mm 2.8 lens for the most part, with a couple other lenses less frequently.


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Question 4: What’s the best piece of advice that you can give to beginner photographers?

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Answer: Save photos or pieces of artwork you love (on your phone is fine). Study them and study photography like a subject in school. Make lists- what do you love about this photo? What is the angle? The light? The edit? Try to recreate work you admire, simply to learn the techniques used to create it. Build on that with your own ideas. Keep a notebook to write down all ideas as they come to you. Try to make some of them a reality! Don't bother comparing yourself to others if the voice inside your head is negative. Pretty soon you'll realize that your work not looking like other people's work isn't a bad thing- it's because you've developed your own 'style', consciously or not. Go with it. Allow all of this to take time (years).


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Edited By Carl Pack

Chief Editor Of Crosswalks Magazine

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